THE BEARD

In the pulpit he swayed and turned
Leaned forward, backward
His solemn voice echoed,
Lowly the congregation followed;
“Do you love your neighbour?”
Meekly they bow at his keen eye
Now examining a grey head
Hearing under her sobs.
His heart kept assured-
“Her sins weigh on her”
So with her he chats outside;
“Weep not, child you are pardoned,”
“But sir, your beard conjured up
The spirit of my dead goat!”

By Proscovia Rwakyaka

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3 comments on “THE BEARD

    • Hi Mustafa,
      Thanks a lot for your question. First of all we will start by defining satire

      Satire Meaning:
      The use of humor, irony, exaggeration, or ridicule to expose and criticize people’s stupidity or vices, particularly in the context of contemporary politics and other topical issues

      The last two lines of the beard, poem by Proscovia Rwakyaka bring out the use of satire so well.

      So with her he chats outside;
      “Weep not, child you are pardoned,”
      “But sir, your beard conjured up
      The spirit of my dead goat!”

      The preacher in the poem does his best to win over his flock and when he sees the old lady weeping, he is so sure of the impact he of his sermon, and like any preacher would, he tries to speak to her probably make her feel better and give her the assurance of salvation. Only for the old lady to bring it out clearly; the reason she is shedding tears is because the beard of the preacher reminded her of her dead goat and not because she met salvation.

      Hope this helps.

      Like

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